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Day One

Pre-Production

Rationale
Goals
Audience
Technical
Planning
Content
Flowcharting
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Navigation
Concept
Theme
Interface
Page Elements
Storyboards
Prototype

Day Two

Production

Text
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Art
Animation
Video
Resources
HTML
Audio
Multimedia
Assembly

Post Production

Testing
Uploading
Backup
Submissions
Maintenance

 

Day Three

Communications

E-mail
Listserv
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Day Four

Issues

Legal
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Security
Usability
Evaluation
Administration

 

The Incomplete Scanning Guide

this page is on the web at http://users.stlcc.edu/afoster/webteach/scans1.html

Computers are great for manipulating information- but how do you get images into a computer?

This incomplete guide to scanning provides valuable information to anyone who needs to scan or digitize images. It explains the concepts involved in digitizing images, and how to get the best results possible.

 

How it works

A scanner is a cousin to the copy machine. Flatbed scanners consist of a long table with a glass platen. Under the platen is a light source on a motorized carriage. When you tell the scanner to scan, The light powers up, the carriage moves across the face of the platen. An array of CCD's (Charge-Coupled Devices, or light sensitive chips) pick up the image and converts it to electric current. In turn this information is translated into digital data that the scanner software can understand.

So a scanner works the opposite of a printer with which the computer translates digital data and sends it to an output device.

 

Where to Start -obtaining photos

Having a scanner opens up a new world of computing, for now you can import a variety of objects into your computer. These objects are most commonly photos,but can be 3-D objects or even text. In fact, if it can fit onto your scanner-you can scan it! Once you have scanned in your objects, they become digital information which you can edit and enhance.

To do all this, all you need is a TWAIN * compatible device such as a scanner or digital camera, and an image editing software such as Photoshop. Images like these can be used for all kinds of purposes... In fact the final use of the image will go a long way toward how you scan it.

*(What's a TWAIN? Nobody knows. The common wisdom uses it as in the phrase "never the TWAIN shall meet". Could it also mean "This Will All Interconnect Nicely"?. Or maybe it's what Tweety Bird takes when going to visit his cousin Larry).

 

Scanning and Installation -getting your scanner up and running...

Installation is the first step when working with scanners. The installation process itself is very simple and only requires 4 steps:

  • 1.Take your scanner card and insert it into an empty expansion slot on your PC. For a Mac, just hook it up to the SCSI port. Note that Parallel Port scanners are available that can hook into the Printer port of your computer if you have no scanner card. They are quite a bit slower than SCSI scanners.
  • 2.Connect your scanner cable from the scanner card to the scanner.
  • 3.Run the installation software provided on the disks with your scanner. These disks contain drivers allowing your PC to communicate with your scanner.
  • 4.Use an imaging software program such as Photoshop to "call up" your scanner. This is usually done by choosing an Acquire /Import command. Once the software has connected to your scanner, a TWAIN dialog box is displayed on your screen from which you can control all aspects of the image to scan such as its type, color and resolution.
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