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Day One

Pre-Production

Rationale
Goals
Audience
Technical
Planning
Content
Flowcharting
Orientation
Navigation
Concept
Theme
Interface
Page Elements
Storyboards
Prototype

Day Two

Production

Text
Images
Art
Animation
Video
Resources
HTML
Audio
Multimedia
Assembly

Post Production

Testing
Uploading
Backup
Submissions
Maintenance

 

Day Three

Communications

E-mail
Listserv
Newsgroup
Chat
Portfolios
WebBoard

Day Four

Issues

Legal
Privacy
Security
Usability
Evaluation
Administration

 

Incomplete Scanning Guide, Cont.

The Wonders of Modern Scanning Software

Every scanner I have ever seen comes with some type of scanning software that allows the user to perform a limited number of operations on the scan, such as scaling and changing filetype. This new "smart" software will generally produce a good result using the defaults it enacts based on the type of final output you designate.

In saving your scan to the computer, you may need to make a decision as to file format. Use this general rule for determining file types:

  • If you are going to use the image on the web or to display on a computer screen, JPEG files work best for photo like images with a wide range of values.
  • GIF format is best for more graphic information like logos or solid colors.
  • TIFF files are great for high quality print output.
  • BMP is good for windows only printing.
  • PICT is the native Mac format.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

WHAT IS RESOLUTION?

Resolution is the amount of information an image contains. This information comes together in the form of pixels. Pixels appear as tiny dots, which, when placed closely together create the illusion of continuous colors and shades-the colors and shades which give shape to your image.

WHAT IS SCALING?

Scaling refers to the physical size of your image, in inches or pixels, not to its resolution size. A small image requires less disk space and processing time than a larger image but a high resolution (DPI) scan increases your file size tremendously.

WHAT IS MOIRE?

When you scan in an image at too high a resolution or when you are scanning color, Black and White and grayscale photos with fine patterns, the scanner may create what is known as moiré patterns. Imagine a screen passing in front of another- as the hole align and misalign a changing pattern is evident to the eye . Now imagine the scanner array trying to align perfectly with the dots that make up a magazine type image. Now you see the problem.You can overcome this sometimes with a variety of filters in Photoshop.

WHAT IS DPI, PPI, LPI?

When scanning images you need to keep in mind the resolution of the output device through which your images will be displayed. Different output devices use different methods to display image data and have different limitations on their output resolution. These factors need to be taken into account when you scan images.

  • DPI is the number of dots of ink per inch for an image printed on paper. Most laser printers can print at between 300 and 1,200 DPI, depending on the quality and cost of the printer. In general however, you should choose an image's resolution to be lower than the printer's resolution in order to maintain a good level of grays across the printed image.
  • PPI is the number of pixels per inch in an image. This reflects the actual sampling of the scanned photograph where each sample becomes a pixel. The PPI should normally be greater than the DPI in a printed image, giving you room to resize the image, and equal to the screen resolution when the image is going to be displayed on a monitor.
  • LPI is the number of lines per inch in halftone printing. These lines contain halftone dots which, when viewed as a whole, form the image. The LPI is related to the DPI as both deal with printing resolution
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