Thin piece of smoothed limestone with the incised and painted design of a cross. This artifact was discovered in Square 30, locus 02. Two faint words, written in Syriac, are located on each side of the cross.


Reconstruction by Professor David Hanlon of the molded and painted lintel that stood above the doorway into the haikal. It was probably destroyed during the unrest in the 11th century AD.


Reconstruction by Professor David Hanlon of the molded and painted lintel that stood above the doorway into the haikal. It was probably destroyed during the unrest in the 11th century AD.


Vivid reds and black paint highlighted the molded designs on a portion of the lintel dating to the Abbasid Caliphate.


The reds and black paint highlighing the molded designs were protected by being cemented into the rubble below the steps of the derage between the nave and the haikal.


Five fragments of a broken fired brick were reused in an outdoor altar built against the south outer wall of the mudbrick church during the Ayyubid Period. These fragments were discovered in 1988 and a faint Syriac inscription (Sabrah..., "Hope"...) was recognized around the design of a forked arm cross.


Drawing by Professor David Hanlon. Fragments of a fired brick decorated with the design of the cross and worn letters of a Syriac phrase. The only clear word is Sabrah ("Hope"). Andrew Palmer has suggested that the entire inscription may have been Psalms 42:11. The King James Version of Psalms 42:11 translates the text as "Hope thou in God: for I shall yet praise him, who is the health of my countenance, and my God."

The first artifact with Christian iconography found at Tell Tuneinir during 1988 in Area 3, Square 5, locus 10. Half found during 1998 in Area 3, Square 10, Locus 17. Scale is 5 cm.






Drawing by Professor David Hanlon. Fragment of the stone door to a Beth Karbona ("communion bread shrine") found in Area 3, Square 10, Locus 903. Scale is 5 cm.


Drawing by Professor David Hanlon. Fragments of the stone door to a Beth Karbona ("communion bread shrine"). Half found during 1989 in Area 3, Square 12, locus 993. Half found during 1990 in Area 3, Square 13, Locus 25. Scale is 5 cm.


Marble fragment from square 12 discovered during bulk straightening and assigned to locus 993


Drawing by Professor David Hanlon. Fragments of a Byzantine Period lintel found in fragments embedded in the derage ("stairs") between the nave and haikal. Half found during 1990 in Area 3, Square 13, locus 35. Half found during 1992 in Area 3, Square 13, Locus 33. Scale is 5 cm.


Two pieces of a Byzantine Period painted lintel found beneath the floor of the haikal. The complete lintel measures 1.55 meters in length and is decorated with the design of three crosses painted with red and black paint.


Drawing by Professor David Hanlon. Fragments of a panel decorated with the design of the cross. Half found during 1993 in Area 3, Square 13, locus 47. Half found during 1998 in Area 3, Square 10, Locus 17. Scale is 5 cm.


Drawing by Professor David Hanlon. Three fragments of a panel with the design of the cross. The first fragment was found at Tell Tuneinir during 1988 in Area 3, Square 5, locus 10. the discovered during 1990 in Area 3, Square 49, Locus 4. The second fragment was discovered during 1994 in Area 3, Square 29, locus 14. The last fragment was discovered during 1998 in Area 3, Square 9, locus 34. Scale is 5 cm.


Drawing by Professor David Hanlon of a molded plaster panel found in Square 13, Locus 11.


Photograph of the molded plaster panel found in Square 13, Locus 11.


Very few pieces of painted plaster were discovered in Area 3. This fragment was discovered in Square 13, Locus 47.


Photographic credit: Professor David Hanlon, SLCC-MC

Webpage created 13 February 2007.
Migrated 1 April 2008
Webpage updated 25 December 2008