Koso (Syriac, Communion chalice) discovered by Robert McWhorter. It had been intentionally buried in a cistern near the entrance of the church. Reanalysis of the artifacts from the cistern suggest that they were objects damaged during the violence that destroyed in monastery in approximately AD 1030. The shape and style of the chalice closely parallels examples from the Byzantine Period, ca. AD 500.

A radiocarbon sample from the soil fill beneath the glass artifacts has a calibrated radiocarbon date of AD 380 to 700 (Beta-74631) while a sample deeper in the cistern fill has a calibrated radiocarbon date of AD 660 - 970 (Beta-74632).The cistern was discovered during the 1994 excavation season by Robert McWhorter.


One of two Candilo (Syriac, lamp) discovered by Robert McWhorter in the same loci as the communion chalice. This lamp with three suspension handles and a disk foot could have sat on the altar of been suspended by chains from a rafter above the altar.


Second Candilo found by Robert McWhorter in the filled cistern inside the front porch area of the Area 3 mudbrick church.


Another cache containing a glass ampulla was discovered during 1995 near the northwest corner of the church. The ampulla resembles glass flasks dated as early as the 3rd century. Ethnographic evidence suggests that the ampulla served as a container for chrism, the sacred oil used in anointing and in ceremonies of consecration. Glass ampulla with two glass suspension handles found in a cache pit outside the northwest corner of the church. The glass ampulla was discovered during the 1995 excavation season by Kathleen O'toole. It measures 17.3 cm in length, 9.4 cm in width and the wall thickness averages 3 mm. The base has a 3.9 cm deep kick and a distinct pontil mark. The original color is hard to characterize considering the weathering and patination; it was probably colorless to light green. (Scale in centimeters


Drawing of a glass lamp found in the fill of a cistern in Square 30, during bulk removal (locus 13). Probably dating to the 11th century destruction episodse in the monastic complex.



Robert McWhorter excavating a crushed storage jar in Area 3.


Light Green Ware jug with combed decoration, Ayyubid Period. Discovered during 1989 in Square 2 during bulk removal (locus 993).


Pottery sherd found in a storage pit belonging to the priest's house that was attached to the southeast corner of the mudbrick church. Tar brushed onto the surface of the sherd spells out the name W O R OO [D] (Arabic, Rose).


Pottery sherd found in a storage pit belonging to the priest's house that was attached to the southeast corner of the mudbrick church. Tar brushed onto the surface of the sherd spells out the name A B U SH L [M] (Syriac, Father of Peace).
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Portion of a storage vessels from the storage pit belonging to the priest's house. The broken vessel was marked with tar brushed on the surface of the vessels to create the design of a cross.


Fragment of a storage vessel from the storage pit belonging to the priest's house. The broken jugs were marked with tar brushed on the surface of the vessels to create the design of a cross. These sherds were discovered during the 1996 field season in Square 50, locus 24. Special registration number 5486.1.


In situ pottery vessels from the storage pit belonging to the priest's house.


Egg shells from the storage pit belonging to the priest's house.


Pottery jar with two handles from Area 3.


Body sherd found on the surface 200 meters east of the Area 3 church. It is decorated with an incised design of the cross.


A pierced pottery sherd used as a spindle whorl. It was discovered in the northwest quadrant of the nave (women's section) where it had been buried beneath a patched section of floor plaster. It is decorated with a simple cross and several poorly executed or pseduo Syriac letters. Reg. no. 456TNR90.


A pierced pottery sherd used as a spindle whorl. It was discovered in the northwest quadrant of the nave (women's section) where it had been buried beneath a patched section of floor plaster. It is decorated with a simple cross and several poorly executed or pseduo Syriac letters. Reg. no. 456TNR90.

Photographic credit: Professor David Hanlon, SLCC-MC
Migrated 1 April 2008
Updated 20 February 2017