Exotic (unusual, rare) artifacts from the Dampier Site (23SL2296)


Two pieces of hematite, natural iron ore


Cut and modified dog bone


Shell beads


Shell bead


Cut piece of shell that is tentatively identified as marine shell.


Fragment of a stone celt.


Large half of a conch shell.


Fragment of copper than had been hammered flat then rolled into a tube.


Cut and rubbed galena (lead ore) from the Dampier site.


A very, very large canine tooth (possibly bear) from the Dampier Site.


Large mussel shell that was smoothed and used as a spoon.


Mandible (jaw bone) of a deer with incised line decoration.


Large discoidal manufactured from a pinkish-red stone that appears to be quartzite.


Bone pen found in association with a dog burial.


Fragment of a carved shell maskette; the left image is the real fragment and the right image is a digital mirror image.


Fragment of a carved shell maskette; the left image is the real fragment and the right image is a digital mirror image.


Fragment of a carved shell maskette; the left image is the real fragment and the right image is a digital mirror image.


Fragments of speleothems (cave deposits such as stalactites and cave coral) were found at the L-shaped building (Feature 106/107 - possible temple), as well as the largest building (Feature 42 - where copper covered ear spools were found). The Winter Solstice sunrise, when viewed from the L-Shaped building, comes up from Blake Mound. A small cave is situated directly beneath Blake Mound. Some Native American nations have traditions about their ancestors emerging from a cave. One possible interpretation for the speleothems at the Dampier site is that the people who lived in this ancient town were viewed the speleothems as relics or talismans of their ancestor's emergence.

Special thanks to Stan Dampier and Joe Harl for discussing the site with me and allowing me to photograph the artifacts illustrated on this webpage. Many thanks to Mark Leach and Larry Kinsella for providing some of the images on this webpage.

Webpage created 26 January 2010
Webpagea updated 20 September 2010.


Webpage constructed 31 July 2009
Webpage revised 24 January 2010