Dawson Mounds 23BO9 - Pipes


Digital re-edited image published by Fowke (1910).


Drawing by Denny (1968) of the pipe from Dawson Mounds.


Sketch done during 2006



Sketch done during 2006

Olive gray (5Y4/1) clay pipe found in Dawson Mound number 11 near a cluster of cremated human bones and three pottery vessels (Fowke 1910:37, Figure 7). This style of pipe belongs to the Late Woodland Period. Denny (1964:Figure 11A) illustrated the pipe in his MA thesis. The pipe measures 106.2 mm in length and 62.9 mm in height. The outer diameter of the pipe bowl measures 34 mm and the inner diameter measures 25.3 mm. The stem end of the pipe measures 12.7 mm in diameter and the draw hole measures 5.6 mm in diameter. The pipe weights 100.7 grams and is dark gray in color (5Y4/1). Missouri Historical Society registration number 1993.100.41.



Digitally re-edited original photograph published by Fowke (1910).


Drawing done by Denny (1964)


Sketch done during 2006.


Top view sketch done during 2006.



Bottom view sketch done during 2006.

Platform pipe carved from a soft white (2.5Y6/2) stone that Fowke described as "like chalk" ( a soft limestone). Fowke reports (1910:37, Figure 8) that the pipe was found under one of the skulls in the mound. This style of pipe belongs to the Middle Woodland Period and resembles an example from the Savannah I Phase in Georgia (Caldwell 1952: Figure 171b). Denny (1964:Figure 11c) illustrated the pipe in his MA thesis. The pipe easures 93.2 mm in length and 65.0 mm in height. The outer diameter of the pipe rim is 33.8 mm and the inner diameter is 20.9 mm. The maximum diameter of the pipe bowl is 45.0 mm. The pipe stem measured 31.6 mm wide by 15.8 mm in height. The diameter of the draw hole is 4.2 mm. The pipe weights 140.6 grams. Missouri Historical Society registration number 1993.100.42.


Caldwell, Joseph R.
1952 The Archaeology of Eastern Georgia and South Carolina. in The Archaeology of the Eastern United States.Edited by James B. Griffin. University of Chicago Press.


Webpage constructed 1 May 2006
Webpage updated 25 February 2007