23MT2 - Graham Cave bone tools


Casts of two bone awls photographed by Eric Smith (Trustee, MAS).

Casts of a decorated bowl pen photographed by Eric Smith (Trustee, MAS).


Casts of a decorated bowl pen photographed by Eric Smith (Trustee, MAS).


Digitized black and white photograph eyed bone needles from Graham Cave.


Digitized black and white photograph eyed bone needles from Graham Cave.


Digitized black and white image of a bone needle from Graham Cave.






Digitized black and white image of a notched piece of antler that was illustrated by Logan (1952:Figure 20b). Possibly the peg that was part of the handle for an atlatl.









Black and white photograph of antler handle illustrated by Logan (1952:20a).





Digitized black and white image of bone tools from Graham Cave.






Digitized black and white image of bone tools from Graham Cave.






Digitized black and white image of bone tools from Graham Cave.








Worked antler tine (specimen no. 6468-53) from level 2; it was illustrated by Klippel (1972: Figure 23 e). Tools like this show evidence of use in pressure flaking stone tools. Approximate length (estimated from illustration) = 15.2 cm and approximately width = 2.1 cm.







Segment of cut and ground antler that was illustrated by Klippel (1971: Figure 23 L). Approximate length (from illustration) = 9.4 cm and approximate width = 4.4 cm.







Two bone pens; one specimen no. 4883.







Long bone shaft (specimen no. 8175-53) not yet finished into a pen; natural layer 2 or 3.







Antler projectile point (specimen no. 7187-53) from level 2, illustrated by Klippel (1972: Figure 23i). Approximate length (from published illustration) = 13.4 cm and approximately width = 1.6 cm).




Special thanks to Candace Sall, Curation Specialist, American Archaeology Division for her assistance in researching the curated archaeological collections of the University of Missouri - Columbia. The images reproduced at this website were graciously provided by the American Archaeology Division (AAD) Museum and Missouri Archaeological Society. A warm thanks to Neathery Batsell Fuller for her advice on the content of the webpage.

Webpage constructed 25 February 2006
Updated 19 October 2014