Dr. Michael Fuller photographed artifacts in the display cases kept in a small room that functions as the monastery museum. The arid environment around Deir Mar Musa as allowed for the rare preservation of cloth, fiber, and wooden artifacts - as well as pottery and metal. I have noted dates for some artifacts as published by Ahmad Farzat Taraqgi in an article entitled "Studio dei reperti archeologici nel Monastero d'San Mose' L'Abissino" that was published in Il Retauro del Monastero di San Mose' L'Abissino, Nebek, Syria. This report was published in Damascus in 1998.




Fragment of a banded textile that appears (through the glass) to be wool. Most likely it is Ottoman, but could be Medieval. C-14 analysis would be the only way to determine.







Fragment of a basket made from split and woven plant fibers.







Page of text written in Syriac.







Hand broom made of plant fibers and cordage. Taraqgi (1998:81) considers this to date from the 19th or 20th century.







The largest coin is identified by Taraqgi (1998:77) as a Byzantine follis minted in Nicomedia (NIKO mint name) and beloning to the reign of Justin II (AD 565 to 578). It close to or the same issue as Sear 369 in Byzantine Coins (2002:94). The coin on the right resembles the reverse of a series of anonymous follis issued by Niceophorus III (AD 1080 - 1081) based upon an specimen 1889 published by Sear (2002). The Byzantine coin on left hand size is too worn to identify. Mamluk copper coins were noted by Taraqgi (1998:78) including an issue of Zahir Baybars (AD 1260 - 1277).




http://users.stlcc.edu/mfuller/MarMusa/HingeBuckleArrowhead.JPG


Glazed clay oil lamps that Taraqgi (1998:Figure 91) identifies as Ottoman.







Glazed briq (Arabic, spouted water jug) that Taraqgi (1998:80; page 79) dates to the 18th century.







Typical Mamluk painted bodysherd of the 14th century AD.







Splash Glaze bowl without sgraffito design that Taraqgi (1998:79) dates to the 17th and 18th centuries. I am not sure that this pottery is that late.







Splash glaze sgraffito bowls sherds that Taraqgi (1998:79) dates to the 16th and 17th centuries. I am not sure that this pottery is that late.







Splash glaze sgraffito bowls sherds that Taraqgi (1998:79) dates to the 16th and 17th centuries. I am not sure that this pottery is that late.







Splash glaze sgraffito bowls sherds that Taraqgi (1998:79) dates to the 16th and 17th centuries. I am not sure that this pottery is that late.







Copy of the incensor currently in the British Museum. Sir Richard Burton collected the original specimen while visiting the site during the 18th century.







Detail of Christ on the cross from the Deir Mar Musa incensor.