McDonnell Douglas Site 23SC1006

This site was discovered in 1968 by Richard Martens on a terrace along the Missouri River and is published by Martens (2006: 10 - 14) in the Missouri Archaeological Society Quarterly.
Mississippian arrowpoints from the surface of the McDonnell Douglas site.

Madison points, Reed points, Cahokia points, and Scallorn points [Martens 2006:Figure 2].


Left: Length = 26 mm, Width = 19 mm, Thickness = 4 mm, and Weight = 1.6 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 18]
Center: Length = 16 mm, Width = 13 mm, Thickness =3 mm, and Weight = 0.6 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 24]
Right: Length = 23 mm, Width = 14 mm, Thickness = 3 mm, and Weight = 0.8 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 22]



Left: Length = 29 mm, Width = 14 mm, Thickness = 3 mm, and Weight = 0.8 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 21]
Center: Length = 31 mm, Width = 16 mm, Thickness = 4 mm, and Weight = 1.6 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 19]
Right: Length = 20 mm, Width = 14 mm, Thickness = 3 mm, and Weight = 0.6 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 15]



Left Alba point: Length = 26 mm, Width = 19 mm, Thickness = 3 mm, and Weight = 1.0 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 6]
Center Abla: Length = 27 mm, Width = 16 mm, Thickness = 3 mm, and Weight = 0.9 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 7]
Right: Length = 37 mm, Width = 12 mm, Thickness = 4 mm, and Weight = 1.2 g. [not published by Martens]



Left: Length = 18 mm, Width = 14 mm, Thickness = 3 mm, and Weight = 0.6 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 5]
Center: Length = 21 mm, Width = 16 mm, Thickness = 3 mm, and Weight = 0.8 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 4]
Right: Length = 47 mm, Width = 19 mm, Thickness = 7 mm, and Weight = 6.4 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 1]



Left: Length = 19 mm, Width = 16 mm, Thickness = 3 mm, and Weight = 0.7 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 14]
Center: Length = 28 mm, Width = 12 mm, Thickness = 3 mm, and Weight = 0.7 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 3]
Right: Length = 47 mm, Width = 19 mm, Thickness = 7 mm, and Weight = 6.4 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 2]



Left: Length = 28 mm, Width = 13 mm, Thickness = 3 mm, and Weight = 1.0 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 12]
Center: Length = 28 mm, Width = 17 mm, Thickness = 3 mm, and Weight = 1.1 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 10]
Right: Length = 31 mm, Width = 16 mm, Thickness = 3 mm, and Weight = 1.6 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 9]




Left: Length = 19 mm, Width = 16 mm, Thickness = 3 mm, and Weight = 0.7 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 13]
Center: Length = 27 mm, Width = 14 mm, Thickness = 3 mm, and Weight = 0.8 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 11]
Right: Length = 24 mm, Width = 16 mm, thickness = 4 mm, and Weight = 1.1 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 21]



Left: Length = 28 mm, Width = 14 mm, Thickness = 4 mm, and Weight = 1.2 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 9]
Right: Length = 18 mm, Width = 11 mm, Thickness = 3 mm, and Weight = 0.4 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 2 specimen 16]



Three Early to Middle Woodland scrapers and four Mississippian drills/perforators (Martens 2006: Figure 3).



Early and Middle Woodland Period projectile points from the site (Martens 2006:Figure 1)



Decorated pottery sherds; all Mississippian except for the crosshatched rimsherd that may be Middle Woodland (Martens 2006:Figure 4).



Rimsherds and the handle from the Tippetts Bean Pot (Lower right) dating to the Mississippian Period. The cordmarked rimsherds (lower left) probably dates to the Late Woodland Period (Martens 2006: Figure 5).



Caddo - like, engraved pottery sherd: Length = 37 mm, Width = 42 mm, Thickness = 3 mm, and Weight = 6.2 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 4 specimen f]



Ramey incised pottery sherd: Length = 34 mm, Width = 22 mm, Thickness = 3 mm, and Weight = 2.3 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 4 specimen a]



Crosshatched pottery sherd: Length = 32 mm, Width = 28 mm, Thickness = 6 mm, and Weight = 5.4 g. [Martens 2006:Figure 4 specimen c]


23SC1006 was destroyed as a result of the construction of a missile facility by the McDonnell Douglas Company. The surface survey of the site yielded burned daub, hoe fragments with silica sheen (corn gloss), pottery sherds, and projectile points. The site is interpreted as a cluster of farmsteads or a small village. Human long bone fragments and 10 tooth crowns were surface collected from the site. Professor Daniel Wescott (University of Missouri Department of Anthropology) examined the human remains and suggested that the fragments are from at least two or three individuals. The human skeletal remains were turned over to the State Historic Preservation Office, Missouri Department of Natural Resources.


Molar crowns with significant dental attrition.



Teeth from the surface of the site.



Teeth from the surface of the site.



Martens, Richard E.
2006 The McDonnell Douglas Site (23SC1006): A "Lost Site" in St. Charles County, Missouri. Missouri Arachaeological Society Quarterly 23(4): 10 - 14.


The digital photographs of the arrowpoints and pottery sherds were taken with permission of Richard E. Martens, Treasurer of the Missouri Archaeological Society.



Webpage constructed 9 October 2008
Updated 4 October 2016