Professor Robert Smith supervised excavations at Pella of the Decapolis for Wooster College. All of the sherds illustrated in this webpage where digitally photographed by Professor Michael Fuller with the kind assistance of Professor P. Nick Kardulias, and Stephanie Bosch (Wooster College Archaeology Laboratory). The ceiling of tomb 7 had collapsed in approximately AD 1000 forming a sinkhole that was used as a dump for approximately 600 years. The fill contained a large amount of pottery and animal bones. Hans Stampfli identified the animal species as including cow, got, sheep, dog, donkey, and pig; tentative identifications also included camel and chicken (Smith 1973: 193 - 194).


Glazed sherd #10406; left = exterior and right = interior. Published in Pella, Volume 1, plate 72.807. Thickness = 12.5 mm and weight = 73.9 grams.



Mamluk painted sherd # 10408; left = exterior and right = interior. Published in Pella, Volume 1, plate 71.1011. Thickness = 9.2 mm and weight = 27.1 grams. [This sherd was thin section analyzed so only the left half was photographed.]


Mamluk painted sherd #10297; left = exterior and right = interior. Published in Pella, Volume 1, plate 73.1012. Thickness ranges from 10.1 to 15.8 mm and weight = 17.2 grams.






Undecorated sherd #10843 in Pella, Volume 1, plate 73.913. Thickness ranges from 9.9 mm at the rim to 10.1 mm in the body; the weight = 135.6 grams. A light brown slip was applied over a red ware paste; light gray core suggested that it was not fully fired.






Undecorated sherd #10351 from a jar. Thickness ranges from 18.5 mm at the rim to 7.7 mm in the body; the weight = 43.1 grams.




Rimsherd #10284 from a bowl Thickness ranges from 11.3 mm at the rim to 6.8 mm in the body; the weight = 29.5 grams. Left = interior and right = exterior. A thin red slip was applied over the rim and exterior.






Gray storage jar handle #10332.





Prepared by Professor Michael Fuller
1 April 2013