Abila - Tomb Q-1

Iconic Roman image of a woman/muse holding a diptych and stylus on the wall of tomb Q-1. The lower half of the image has been lost/damaged since 1982. The wall paintings are dated by the Barbet (1994) to the second and third century AD. The family name, Loukianos (the Greek form of Roman name Lucianus), is written on wall of the tomb. Barbet (1994) refers to it as Tombeau de Loukianos.

Image of the woman/muse holding a diptych and stylus on the wall of tomb Q-1 (Abila) 1982 photograph.


Roman wall painting at tomb Q-1 (Abila), 1982 photograph.


Closeup on the Roman face at tomb Q-1 (Abila), 1982 photograph.


Greek inscription in tomb Q-1 (Abila), summer 2014. Dr. Harold Mare, original director of the American Expedition to Abila, read the inscription in the field and did not like the epitah. "Be brave, Lucian, no one lives forever" and gives the age of Lucian as 4 years old. Barbet (1994) suggests that the age might have been (1)4 years old.


Roman wall painting at tomb Q-1 (Abila), 2014 photograph.


View of the interior of tomb Q-1 (Abila), 2014 photograph.


Roman wall painting at tomb Q-1 (Abila) of a bird in a marsh, 2014 photograph.


Closeup of the Roman wall painting at tomb Q-1 (Abila) of a bird in the marsh, 2014 photograph.


Roman wall painting at tomb Q-1 (Abila) of a woman (Ceres?), 2014 photograph. A vandal used a candle to damage the wall painting.


Basalt door to tomb Q-1 (Abila), 2014 photograph.


Dromos and entrance to tomb Q-1 (Abila), 2014 photograph.

Barbet, Alix
1994 Les peintures des nécropoles romaines d'Abila et du nord de la Jordanie. P. Geuthner, Paris.

Fuller, Michael J.
1987 Abila of the Decapolis : a Roman-Byzantine city in Transjordan. Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Anthopology dissertation.
Webpage created 21 July 2014