Archaeological Institute of America


The St. Louis Society
Founded in 1906

St. Louis Society

History

Excavations:

Mycenae:Prof. George E. Mylonas

Lemp Avenue

ST. LOUIS AIA TIME LINE

and

PRESIDENTS

May 1879 - The Archaeological Institute of America is founded. Charles Eliot Norton serves as the first president for 11 years.

1882 - The American Schools of Classical Studies in Athens is established. It is the first of many American Schools founded by the Institute.

1886 - The American Journal of Archaeology, the professional journal of the Archaeological Institute of America, begins publication. Charles Eliot Norton is the first editor.

1895 - AIA established its first lecture fund. Lecturing scholars are reimbursed for travel to local societies. Harold North Fowler, professor of Greek at Western Reserve University and corresponding secretary of the national AIA, is the inaugrual lecturer. His topic is Greek Art in the Age of Perickles.

1899 - First annual meeting of AIA held for the presentation of scholarly papers. The inaugural meeting is chaired by Charles Eliot Norton, president of the Institute.

1902 - National AIA membership surpasses 1,000 in 9 local societies.

1902 - Harriet A. Boyd becomes the first woman chosen as a traveling lecturer for the national organization.

1906 - U.S. Congress issues a charter to the Archaeological Institute of America; President Theodore Roosevelt introduced the legislation before the congress.


1906 The St. Louis Society of the Archaeological Institute of America is founded on February 8, 1906. The organizational meetings and many early lectures are held at the Buckingham Hotel. William H. Bixby is elected first president of the St. Louis Society. Bixby is a member of the AIA for some years before the local group is organized. The St. Louis Society registers 125 members. Professor Francis W. Kelsey, University of Michigan, lectures at the St. Louis Society's inaugural meeting. His subject is The Destruction of Pompeii and St. Pierre Compared. 250 members and guests gather in the Parlor of the Buckingham Hotel, Kingshighway and West Pine across from Forest Park.
1906 The St. Louis Society of the Archaeological Institute of America is founded on February 8, 1906. The organizational meetings and many early lectures are held at the Buckingham Hotel. William H. Bixby is elected first president of the St. Louis Society. Bixby is a member of the AIA for some years before the local group is organized.
The St. Louis Society registers 125 members. Professor Francis W. Kelsey, University of Michigan, lectures at the St. Louis Society's inaugural meeting. His subject is The Destruction of Pompeii and St. Pierre Compared. 250 members and guests gather in the Parlor of the Buckingham Hotel, Kingshighway and West Pine across from Forest Park.
1907 and 1908 The St. Louis Society underwrites archaeologist Gerard Fowke who carries out a systematic survey and excavation of prehistoric mounds along the Missouri River and its tributaries.
1910 to 1912 Results of Fowke's research in Missouri are published by the Bureau of American Ethnology under the title Antiquities of Central and Southern Missouri.
1910 Edgar L. Hewett lectures in October on the Art of Copan and Quirigua to the St. Louis Society. He reports on the first Hewett Guatemalan expedition, partially funded by the St. Louis Society.
1912 Sylvanus Morley, chief of staff of the Society's Central American expedition to Guatemala is scheduled to discuss The Season's Excavations in Quirigua on May 25th. Upon his arrival in St. Louis, a reoccurrence of jungle fever prevents his appearance. Morley's paper is read by his assistant, Earl Morris.
1912 The St. Louis Society maintains a permanent exhibit of Maya and Aztec material in Gallery 12 of the Museum of Fine Arts.
1912 Dr. Edith Hall of the University of Pennsylvania addresses the St. Louis Society on the topic of Excavations in Crete in 1912. Dr. Hall is probably the first woman archaeologist to address the St. Louis Society.
1916 St. Louis hosts the annual meetings of the AIA and the American Philological Association on December 27th. In addition to committees for general arragements, local AIA members organize a numismatic exhibition, a rug exhibition, an exhibition of Americana, and a series of smokers for the male delegates to be held at varios clubs around town. Committees to plan convention sessions and activities for the ladies are also named. The exhibits are shown at the City Art Museum.
1918 St. Louis society wires lecturer Clarence Moore to cancel his lecture. St. Louis is under an official influenza quarantine. Arthur Stanley Riggs, scheduled to lecture on December 12th is rescheduled for April 10th.
1919 The St. Louis Society files a formal protest against the sale of Cahokia Mound and the potential for utilization of the siet for commercial purposes. This document is setn to the governor of Illinois and to the local press.
1921 The St. Louis Society sends $500 to the Egyptian Exploration Fund in Boston to support excavations at the famous site of El Amarna.
1922 The St. Louis Society purchases the Oxyrynchus Papyri through the efforts of St. Louisian A. Blair Ridington and Professor W. A. Flingers Petrie. These papyri are presented to Washington University for its collections.
1927 William Foxwell Alright, dean of Biblical Archaeology and professor at Johns Hopkins University lectures to the St. Louis Society. His topic is Present Day Archaeological work in Palestine.
1928 George E. Mylonas lectues to the St. Louis Society on topic of Crete in the Dawn of History.
1933 Mylonas joins the faculty of Washington University and becomes a pillar of the St. Louis Society.
1935 Nelson Glueck, rabbi and pioneer in the archaeology of ancient Israel, is the guest speaker at the society's annual meeting. Rabbi Glueck's lecture is entitled Explorations in Bible Lands.
1935 Betty Greenfield Grossman joins the St. Louis Art Museum staff. She will be a pillar in the St. Louis Society for 60 years

1947

Betty Greenfield Grossman hosts a television program for KSD where she discusses art and archaeology. The program is broadcast for 8 years.
1948 St. Louis Society hosts the national meetings of the AIA and the American Philological Association.
1952 George E. Mylonas, Washington University in St. Louis and AIA member, begins the archaeological investigations at Mycenae in Greece. He serves as director of excavations at Eleusis unti 1957 when he became director of excavations at Mycenae. He presents numerous field reports to the St. Louis Society on his work at Eleusis and Mycenae. Several members visit him at Mycenae and help raise the money necessary to continue the excavation.
1953 An annual joint meeting of the St. Louis Society and the St. Louis Engineers Club takes place in October.

1957 to 1960

 

1961

 

 

1965

George E. Mylonas is elected to a three year term as president of the national AIA.

George E. Mylonas, Washington University in St. Louis and AIA member, begins the archaeological investigations at Mycenae in Greece. He serves as director of excavations at Eleusis unti 1957 when he became director of excavations at Mycenae. He presents numerous field reports to the St. Louis Society on his work at Eleusis and Mycenae. Several members visit him at Mycenae and help raise the money necessary to continue the excavation.

George E. Mylonas gives a members-only program to discuss the Washington University collection of Greek vases. His commentary touches on technique, artistic value, and interpretation of the subject matter.

1967

George E. Mylonas offers a unique, members-only program where the Wulfing coin collection at Washington University is discussed and examined. AUA members are encouraged to bring magnifying glasses to the sesion.

1976

 

1980

Dr. Saul S. Weinberg, University of Missouri at Columbia, lectures on the topic Archaeology in Israel, Tel Anafa. The cost of a pre-lecture dinner at the Art Museum is $4.25.

W. Harold Mare, Covenant Theological Seminary in St. Louis and AIA member, begins the archaeological investigations at Abila of the Decapolis in Jordan. He reports annually on his discoveries to the St. Louis Society. Dr. Mare served as AIA Society President 1978 -1979.

1983

 

Saranatis Symeonoglou, Washington University in St. Louis and AIA member, begins the archaeological investigations at Mt. Aetos on the island of Ithaka, Greece. He reports periodically on his discoveries to the St. Louis Society. Dr. Symeonoglou served as AIA Society President 1992.

 

1986

 

1987

St. Louis Society celebrates its 80th anniversary year. Betty Grossman compiles a short history of the local group.
Michael and Neathery Fuller, St. Louis Community College, begin the archaeological investigations Tell Tuneinir in ancient Mesopotamia. They report annually on his discoveries to the St. Louis Society. Michael Fuller served as AIA Society President 1987-1988. Neathery Batsell Fuller was AIA Society President 1997 -1998 and served on the AIA National Board 1997-2001 She served on the Gold Medal committee, the Neat Eastern Committee, the Newsletter Committee and Chaired the Education Committee..
1988 Judy Brilliant creates the Junior Archaeology Program of the St. Louis Sosciety. which is jointly sponsored with the St. Louis School Partnership program and the St. Louis Art Museum. The award winning program pairs city and county shools in a multi-session immersion into archaeology and all its ramifications - history, art, science, ethnics, excavation, measurement, and critical thinking.

1988

1988

 

1996

 

1993

 

1997

 

1999

2000

2001

 

George E. Mylonas dies in Athens.

St. Louis Society of AIA and Washington University inaugurate the annual George E. Mylonas Memorial Lecture on October 16th. Spyros Iakovidis from the University of Pennsylvania lectures on George E. Mylonas: Uncovering Ancient Mycenae.

St. Louis Society of AIA goes on-line with its webpage.

The Junior Archaeology Partnership St. Louis AIA, Art Museum and School Partnership receive the United Technologies Corporation Exemplary Program Award. The prestigious honor is presented at the national symposium of the National Association of Partners in Education.

St. Louis Society celebrates its 90th anniversary with a two day symposium organized by Ann Dempsey. The symposium topic is At Home in the Ancient World; the program is hosted by the St. Louis Art Museum and Concordia Seminary.

Professor Patty Jo Watson wins the AIA's Gold Medal Award.

Michael Fuller serves again as president.

Michael Fuller is chosen to be the Kershaw Lecturer.

 

PAST PRESIDENTS

PAST PRESIDENTS

Past Presidents of the St. Louis Society include businessmen and women, professors, chancellors, painters, engineers, and physicians.

1906 W. K. Bixby
1908 Dr. John Green
1910 Robert S. Brookings
1911 Henry Whelpley
1914 Prof. Frederick W. Shipley
1915 Arthur Bostwick
1918 Dr. Frederick A. Hall
1928 J. M. Wulfing
1929 Dr. George A. Throop
1945 Dr. Erich Brockelmann
1947 Prof. Eugene Tavenner
1949 Prof. George E. Mylonas
1951 William Bryan
1953 Dr. Paul Titterington
1956 Prof. William Arndt
1957 Prof. William Korfmacher
1959 Prof. Phillip DeLacy
1961 Dr. Betty Grossman
1963 Wilfred V. MacDonald
1965 Wallace Herndon Smith
1966 Thomas Wagner
1968 Prof. Chauncey Finch
1970 Prof. Edgar Krentz
1972 Mary Critzas
1974 Prof. David Belmont
1976 Wilfred V. MacDonald
1978 Prof. Harold Mare
1980 G. Kenneth Robins
1982 Prof. Carl Graesser
1983 Prof. George S. Robbert
1985 Judith Feinberg Brillant
1987 Prof. Michael Fuller
1991 Dr. Harold Stigers
1992 Prof. Sarantis Symeonoglou
1993 Prof. George S. Robbert
1995 Prof. K. Ann Dempsey
1997 Neathery Batsell Fuller
1999 Judith Feinberg Brillant
2001 Prof. Michael J. Fuller

1906 W. K. Bixby

1949 Prof. George E. Mylonas

1983 Prof. George S. Robbert

1961 Dr. Betty Grossman

1987 & 2001

Prof. Michael Fuller

1978 Prof. Harold Mare

1985 & 1991

Judith Feinberg Brillant

1991 Dr. Harold Stigers

1992 Prof. Sarantis Symeonoglou

1997 Neathery Batsell Fuller

1995 Prof. K. Ann Dempsey