Many inscriptions in Greek were excavated by the Princeton University Archaeological Expedition to Antioch



Marble gravestone with a Greek inscription; dated to the 1st or 2nd century AD. The inscription is translated as "Caesianus, free of care, hail and farewell." [On display in the Worchester Art Museum.]

Closeup of Caesianus holding a carafe (glass container of wine). [On display in the Worchester Art Museum.]

Marble gravestone with a Greek inscription (I - 133); dated to the 1st or 2nd century AD. The inscription is translated as "Claudius, free of care, hail and farewell." This was found in excavation area 24-L, Cemetery B, corridor 6 on April 16, 1935. The original publication (Downey 1938:153) indentified the individual as a woman named Claudi[a]. [On display in the Worchester Art Museum.]

Black and white field photograph of the Claudius gravestone. The gravestone was discovered in cemetery B; corridor 6. Height = 34 cm, width = 35.2 cm, and thickness = 5 cm. [On display in the Worchester Art Museum.]

Closeup of the marble gravestone of Claudius. [On display in the Worchester Art Museum.]

Broken marble gravestone with a Greek inscription (I-70); dated to the 1st or 2nd century AD. This fragment was purchased so its exact findspot at Antioch is not known. Height = 20.4 cm, width = 19 cm, and thickness = 2 cm. Downey (1938:163) translates the inscription as "Be of good cheer, Eudaimon." [Excavation archives in the Princeton University Department of Art and Archaeology.]

Fragment of a marble gravestone with a Greek inscription (I-268). This fragment came from the Daphne excavation area.

Fragment of pink-veined marble gravestone with a Greek inscription (no. 43) below the design of a menorah (seven-branched candlestick). Downey (1938:150-1) considered several possibilities for the inscription; it might be interpreted as signifying a a sculptor or even stone-cutter. It might also an Aramaic name that would be the equivalent of the Latin name Cicero. Downey noted that it is unclear if the inscription was made by the Jewish community or Early Christian community. This fragment came from the surface of the 13-R excavation area. The fragment measures 14.7 by 10.7 cm and a thickness of 2.4 cm.

Fragment of a gravestone with a Greek inscription (no. 265). This pieces was purchased by the American expedition so its exact findspot is unknown. It measures 29.2 by 22 cm with a thickness of 3.4 cm. The height of the letters is 1.7 cm.
Downey, Glanville
1938 Greek and Latin Inscriptions in Antioch-on-the-Orontes II, Edited by Richard Stillwell. Princeton University Press.
Webpage constructed 15 August 2015
Webpage updated 23 September 2015