23SL20 - Creve Coeur Site Pottery

Blake (n.d.:10) reported that over 2,500 pottery sherds were recovered during the rescue excavation of 23SL20. The majority of the sherds (86%) are classified as Middle Woodland, while 9% of the sherds were classified as Late Woodland (coming primarily from an intrusive pit feature designated number 2). Blake (n.d.:10) noted that the Late Woodland sherds still retained "some Hopewell characteristics." The remainder (5%) could not be assigned to a specific time period.

Naples Stamped sherd collected by Leonard Blake in the 1945. This distinctive pottery ware is considered to be typical of the period 100 BC to AD 250. Thickness = 11 mm and weight = 64.0 grams. St. Loius County Park collection.


Left, plainware bodysherd; thickness = 8.4 mm and 21.5 grams. Right, rimsherd; thickness = 8.2 mm and 9.1 grams. Richard Martens collection.


Left, Dentate decorated bodysherd; thickness = 6.9 mm and 8.8 grams. Right, Dentate decorated bodysherd; thickness = 8.9 mm and 5.1 grams. Richard Martens collection.


Rockermarked pottery sherd found by Leonard Blake in the 1940s. Scanned from The Archaeology of Missouri II by Carl H. Chapman (1980).


 



Clay figurine fragment discovered by Leonard Blake in the 1950s. Scanned from The Archaeology of Missouri II by Carl Chapman (1980).


Havana Plain rimsherds with punch-and-boss decoration found by Leonard Blake in the 1940s. Scanned from The Archaeology of Missouri II by Carl H. Chapman (1980).


Havana cordmarked rimsherd found by Leonard Blake in the 1940s. Scanned from The Archaeology of Missouri II by Carl H. Chapman (1980).


Havana zoned rimsherd with stamping found by Leonard Blake in the 1940s. Scanned from The Archaeology of Missouri II by Carl H. Chapman (1980).

Havana crosshatched rimsherd found by Leonard Blake in the 1940s. Scanned from The Archaeology of Missouri II by Carl H. Chapman (1980).

 

Weaver Plain ware sherds found by Leonard Blake in the 1940s. Scanned from The Archaeology of Missouri II by Carl H. Chapman (1980)"

Crosshatched rimsherd recovered from 23SL20 by Leonard Blake in the 1940s. Scanned from Heritage of the Creve Coeur area. edited by Gloria Dalton (1976).

Rimshed with bunch-and-boss decoration recovered from 23SL20 by Leonard Blake in the 1940s. Scanned from Heritage of the Creve Coeur area. edited by Gloria Dalton (1976).

Rocker decorated rimsherd recovered from 23SL20 by Leonard Blake in the 1940s. Scanned from Heritage of the Creve Coeur area. edited by Gloria Dalton (1976).

Rimsherd decorated with dentate rocker design recovered from 23SL20 by Leonard Blake in the 1940s. Scanned from Heritage of the Creve Coeur area. edited by Gloria Dalton (1976).

Scanned image of Creve Coeur rimsherds from Chapman (1968) The Havana tradition and the Hopewell Problem in the Lower Missouri River Valley.


University of Michigan collection



University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

Univeristy of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

Univeristy of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

Red filmed sherd, University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection

University of Michigan collection
Thanks to Candace Sall, Curation Specialist, American Archaeology Division for her assistance in researching the curated archaeological collections of the University of Missouri - Columbia. This image was graciously provided by the American Archaeology Division (AAD) Museum and Missouri Archaeological Society. Thanks to Karen O'Brien (Collections Manager, Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan) and John Speth (Curator, Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan) for permission to study artifacts from Missouri in the Museum of Anthropology at the University of Michigan. Special thanks to the late Dr. Leonard Blake (Washington University in St. Louis) for teaching me about St. Louis sites excavated by amateurs in the 1940s and 1950s. Many smiles to Ettus Hiatt for her help with text and content editing.

Webpage constructed 27 October 2005
Revised 15 November 2009