Several statues and wall paintings of different godesses were uncovered by the Yale University Expedition to Dura Europos, Syria. These artistic representations pre-date the city's destruction that occurred in AD 257.

Molded plaster relief of Aphrodite Anadyomene; she looks into a mirror which she holds in her left hand (Downey 1977:162, . This relief was found in House G5-C2 at Dura Europos. This relief is dated to AD 200 to 256. The house was situated near the military quarter and may have functioned as a brothel. On display in the Yale University Art Museum.


Photograph of the Aphrodite court of the Artemis Temple during excavation by the Yale University archaeological expedition to Dura Europos, Syria.


Julia Domna (AD 170 - 217) inscription from the Temple of Artemis. "The Assembly of Aurelian Antoninian Europaians [dedicates this to] Julia Domna, August, Mother of the Senate and of the Sacred Camps." Yale University reg. no. 1930.626. On display in the Yale University Art Museum.


Import marble statue of Aphrodite Urania found in Chapel B of the Temple of Artemis (Downey 1977:165; Figure 27). Slide image taken during 1988 in the Louvre Museum, Paris.



In situ photograph of a wall painting showing Aphrodite and Cupid at Dura Europos by Yale University archaeologists. This wall painting was discovered inside the House of the Scribes.


Artist copy of a wall painting showing Aphrodite and Cupid at Dura Europos by Yale University archaeologists. This wall painting was discovered inside the House of the Scribes.


Fragment of a marble statue of Aphrodite from Dura Europos. On display in the Yale University Art Museum.


Fragment of a marble statue of half-draped Aphrodite from Dura Europos. On display in the Yale University Art Museum.


Fragment of a wooden figurine of Aphrodite from Dura Europos. On display in the Yale University Art Museum.


Atargatis, a Syrian goddess, with doves. Relief from the Temple of Adonis at Dura Europos. Dated approximately to the first century AD. On display in the Yale University Art Museum.


Atargatis, a Syrian goddess, seated with the god named Hadad. Relief from the Temple of Atargatis in Block H2 at Dura Europos. Dated from AD 100 to 256. On display in the Yale University Art Museum.


Moldmade clay figurine of a goddess found during 1931 at Dura Europos, Syria.


Marble relief of the goddess Nemesis (right) receiving a burnt offering by a priest named Julius Aurelius Malochus. The relief includes a "floating" bust with a radiant aura around the bust. One interpretation is that the bust symbolizes the cosmic power of the goddess. At the feet of the goddess is a wheel (a typical symbol associated with the goddess) and a griffin. On display in the Yale University Art Museum.

Downey, Susan B.
1977 The Stone and Plaster Sculpture: Excavations at Dura-Europos. University of California, Los Angeles.
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Webpage updated 4 December 2015