The Leary Site (25RH1) is an archaeological site located in the southeast corner of Nebraska.




Beveled "Harahey" style knife. A double-beveled knife form that is sometimes called "diamond-shaped." This example closely parallels specimens from the Utz Site (23SA2) along the Missouri River.







Another example of a "Harahey" style knife.







Another example of a "Harahey" style knife. A small quartz filled vug gives this knife a fish-like appearance.







Probably a very resharpened "Harahey" style knife.







Large chert biface. Possible knife or lance point.







Large chert biface. Possible knife based upon the polish present on the tip end of the stone tool.







Large chert biface. Possible knife or lance preform.







Large chert biface. Possible knife or lance point.







Side-Notched arrowpoint from tan chert. The exceptional workmanship and material of this artifact is not typical of the majority of the projectile points from the site. Weight = 0.9 grams. Size 2.0 x 1.2 x 0.3 cm.







Unnotched arrowpoint manufactured from a non-local chert.







Another example of an unnotched arrowpoint manufactured from a non-local chert. Weight 0.9 grams. Size 2.1 x 1.4 x 0.25 cm.







A chalcedony waste flake - not from a nearby source. Weight 2.1 grams. Size 2.5 x 2.5 x 0.35 cm.







A waste flake from either obsidian or trade glass. Weight 6.1 grams. Size 2.9 x 2.7 x 0.7 cm.







A typical small, unnotched arrowpoint.







A typical small, unnotched arrowpoint. Weight 0.9 grams. Size 2.0 x 1.4 x 0.25 cm







Small arrowpoint with a concave base. Weight 1.0 grams. Size 1.9 x 1.1 x 0.4 cm.







Small arrowpoint from heat treated Burlington chert. Weight 1.0 grams. Size 2.0 x 1.3 x 0.3 cm.







Another example of a small arrowpoint from heat treated Burlington chert. Weight 1.1 grams. Size 2.2 x 1.4 x 0.35 cm.







Arrowpoint with a length/width ratio that differs from most examples found at the Leary site. Weight 1.6 grams. Size 3.4 x 1.7 x 0.3 cm.







Broken example of a double-bit drill. This example was finely flake and could also have been a willow-leaf style arrowpoint. Double-bit drills are known from the Oneota phase at the Utz Site (23SA2) in Missouri. Weight 1.0 grams. Size 4.4 x 0.7 x 0.4 cm.







Another example of a double-bit drill.







Retouching flakes on a cortex backed blade.







Utilized chert blade.







Large end scraper manufactured out of gray chert.







Medium size end scraper.







Large end scraper manufactured out of white chert.







Shaped piece of petrified wood. Weight 19.4 grams. Size 8.1 x 4.0 x 0.6 cm.







Piece of turquoise disk bead. Bray (1991:134) reported a turquoise bead from the Utz Site in Saline County, Mo. Weight 0.6 grams. Size 1.7 x 0.6 x 0.4 cm.




Click here to see a small sample of pottery from the Leary Site

Click here to see a small sample of worked Catlinite from the Leary Site

Click here to see a small sample of bone and shell artifacts from the Leary Site




Michael Fisher, President Emeritus of the Missouri Archaeological Society, carefully recorded surface finds from the site during the period 1960 through 1980. Prof. Michael Fuller (St. Louis Community College) studied a small portion of his collection during June of 2004.

The 150 acre village site and has been proposed as an ancestral village to the Oto tribe. On the otherhand, Dorsey reports that "when the [Pawnee] people were first put on earth they were placed near what is now Nemaha, Nebraska." Today, the site is owned and protected by the Iowa tribe. They do not allow visitors to the site.

Lewis and Clark visited the abandoned village during the journey upriver. A few contact era trade items have been discovered at the site. The site is near the modern city of St. Joseph, MO.

References:

Bray, Robert
1991 The Utz Site: An Oneota Village in Central Missouri. Missouri Archaeologist 52.

Dorsey, George
1997 Pawnee Mythology. Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press. (reprint of an older edition)

Hill, A. T. and Waldo Wedel
1936 Excavations at the Leary Indian Village and Burial Site, Richardson Counnty, Nebraska. Nebraska History Magazine 17(1): 3-73.

Strong, William Duncan
1935 An Introduction to Nebraska Archaeology. Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections 93(10):41.

Waldo, Wedel
1959 An Introduction to Kansas Archaeology. BAE 174:98- 171.

Webpage created 1 September 2004