Maddin Creek Rock Art Site - 23WA26

This site is on protected land, difficult to reach, and not open to the public.
The Maddin Creek rock art site, also called the Cresswell Site, belongs to the "Big Five" group defined by Diaz-Granados as comprising Washington State Park A, Washington State Park B, Wallen Creek, Three Hills Creek, and Maddin Creek. The site was discovered in 1939 by Frank Magre, a pioneer in the study of Missouri rock art. The Maddin Creek site was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on February 12, 1971. A detailed map of the various panels was prepared by Frank Magre, Father Benedict Ellis and Father Johnathon Schneider. The style and motifs of the Maddin Creek rock art site date to approximately AD 1200 - 1700. Magre mapped 238 individual petroglyphs at the site including 2 birds, 28 thunderbirds, 8 sets of turkey tracks, 17 snakes, 8 human foot prints, 4 circles, 11 bi-lobed arrows, 22 phallic signs, 7 female genitilia, 20 human figures, 4 hands, and 2 crosses.

Boulder with several petroglyphs photographed at the Maddin Creek Site by Douglas Porter, a member of the Missouri Archaeological Society, during March of 2018.
A chalked version of this panel at the Maddin Creek site was originally published by Wellman (1979:Figure 796) who described the scene on the lower edge as "two round-headed warriors faceing each other with bows and arrows." The larger figure wears a feather bonnet headdress and points how bow to the right. The second figure is unfortunately in a shadow betwenn the larger igure and a very prominent pit and groove petroglyph. Diaz-Granados and Duncan (2000:Plate 7) also identify this scene as "Archers in Combat."

Closeup of an open hand petroglyph on a large boulder at the Maddin Creek Site photographed at the Madden Creek Site by Douglas Porter during March of 2018.

Closeup of a petroglyphs of two archers in combat at the Maddin Creek Site. The legs of the smaller, second archer are visible. Photographed by Douglas Porter during March of 2018.



Closeup of petroglyphs including a animal running right to left on a large boulder at the Maddin Creek Site. Photographed by Douglas Porter during March of 2018.

Line drawing of a petroglyph panel at the Maddin Creek Site. Original drawing by Frank Magre from a projected 35 mm slide and retracing by Steve Teczar in 1969 in preparation for the National Register nomination of the site. This drawing was used in the documentation portion of the National Register nomination.

Line drawing of a petroglyph panel at the Maddin Creek Site. Original drawing by Frank Magre from a projected 35 mm slide and retracing by Steve Teczar in 1969 in preparation for the National Register nomination of the site. This drawing was used in the documentation portion of the National Register nomination.

Line drawing of a petroglyph panel at the Maddin Creek Site. Original drawing by Frank Magre from a projected 35 mm slide and retracing by Steve Teczar in 1969 in preparation for the National Register nomination of the site. This drawing was used in the documentation portion of the National Register nomination.

Professors Michael Fuller and Walter Clark (St. Louis Community College) visited the site with a group of anthropology students from St. Louis Community College during the early 1980s. Frank Magre was our guide to the site and brought a copy of his hand drawn plan of the petroglyphs. Scanned portions of Magre's map of the rock art include the famous design that he interpreted as a woman giving birth to multiple children. Plan of Maddin Creek rock art panel interpreted as the birth of multiple children.

Plan of Maddin Creek rock art site showing birds and ceremonial axes.

Plan of Maddin Creek rock art site showing a cross in circle design as well as several bi-lobed arrows.

Plan of Maddin Creek rock art site showing plants and men.

Dick Martens, a Board Member of the Missouri Archaeological Society, has kindly lent a set of color slides from his visit to the site with Frank Magre on April 19, 1970. On that visit, Frank had chalked the designs. Carol Diaz-Granados visited the site with Frank Magre during her dissertation research (Diaz-Granados and Duncan 2000) in the 1980s.

Maddin Creek rock art site. (Slide taken by Richard E. Martens, Missouri Archaeological Society).

Maddin Creek rock art site. (Slide taken by Richard E. Martens, Missouri Archaeological Society).

Maddin Creek rock art site. (Slide taken by Richard E. Martens, Missouri Archaeological Society).
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Maddin Creek rock art site. (Slide taken by Richard E. Martens, Missouri Archaeological Society).

Maddin Creek rock art site. (Slide taken by Richard E. Martens, Missouri Archaeological Society).
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Maddin Creek rock art site. (Slide taken by Richard E. Martens, Missouri Archaeological Society).

Maddin Creek rock art site. (Slide taken by Richard E. Martens, Missouri Archaeological Society).

Maddin Creek rock art site. (Slide taken by Richard E. Martens, Missouri Archaeological Society).

Maddin Creek rock art site. (Slide taken by Richard E. Martens, Missouri Archaeological Society).

Maddin Creek rock art site. (Slide taken by Richard E. Martens, Missouri Archaeological Society).

Maddin Creek rock art site. (Slide taken by Richard E. Martens, Missouri Archaeological Society).


Maddin Creek rock art site. (Slide taken by Richard E. Martens, Missouri Archaeological Society).

Maddin Creek rock art site. (Slide taken by Richard E. Martens, Missouri Archaeological Society).

Maddin Creek rock art site. (Slide taken by Richard E. Martens, Missouri Archaeological Society).

Maddin Creek rock art site. (Slide taken by Richard E. Martens, Missouri Archaeological Society).

Mrs. and Mrs. Frank Magre (4 and 5 individuals from the left side), Professor Walter Clark (3rd from the left) and Professor Michael fuller (5th from the left) and anthropology students from St. Louis Community College.

Frank Magre hiking towards the site.

Frank Magre walking behind Professor Michael Fuller as they are hiking towards the site. Photograph by Virginia Schumacher.

Frank Magre chalking the petroglyphs at the Maddin Creek site. Chalking is no longer an accepted method of recording petroglyphs.

Frank Magre supervising students who are chalking the petroglyphs at the Maddin Creek site. Chalking is no longer an accepted method of recording petroglyphs. Photograph taken by Virginia Schumacher.

George and Loretta (SLCC students) trace a Maddin Creek site petroglyph on a sheet of frosted mylar plastic.

Photograph taken during the SLCC visit to the Maddin Creek Site.

Photograph taken during the SLCC visit to the Maddin Creek Site by Virginia Schumacher, a student in fieldmethods of archaeology class at STLCC.



Photograph taken during the SLCC visit to the Maddin Creek Site by Virginia Schumacher, a student in fieldmethods of archaeology class at STLCC. Outline done with Photoshop.

Bibliography

Diaz-Granados, Carol
1993 The Petroglyphs and Pictographs of Missouri - a distributional, stylistic, contextual, temporal and functional analysis of the State's Rock Art. Unpublished dissertation, Department of Anthropology, Washington University in St. Louis.

Diaz-Granados, Carol and James R. Duncan
2000 The Petroglyphs and Pictographs of Missouri. University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa.
2004 Reflections of Power, Wealth, and Sex in Missouri Rock-Art Motifs. The Rock-Art of Eastern North Amereica: Capturing Images and Insights. University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa

Diesing, Eugene H.
1955 Archaeological Features in and around Washington State Park in Washington and Jefferson Counties, Missouri. The Missouri Archaeologist. 17(1): 12-23.

Diesing, Eugene H. and Frank Magre
1942 Petroglyphs and Pictographs in Missouri. The Missouri Archaeologist. 8(1): 8-18.

Wellman, Klaus F.
1979 A Survey of North American Indian Rock Art. Akademische Druck- u. Verlagsanstalt, Graz.

Wyatt, Ronald
1959 Summer Fieldwork at Washington State Park, Missouri. Missouri Archaeological Society Newsletter 134:7-10.


Many thanks to Frank Magre for being my guide to this site, early in my career. Special thanks to Doug Porter and xxx.
Prepared by Professor Michael Fuller, 27 December 2004

Site updated 23 March 2018