Sandy Woods Site, 23ST26 The Sandy Woods Site is located in Scott County in Southeast Missouri. The sample of artifacts from the site were donated by C. C. Anderson in 1904 to the Museum of Anthropology at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. A summary of research at the site can be found in O'Brien and Wood (1998:312-316). O'Brien (1996:60-6) and Chapman (1980:192-193; Figure 5-40). The site is situated on private property and is not open to the public. The site was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on March 4, 1971.

Digitized and colorized map of the fortification wall, mounds, and houses at the Sandy Woods Site based upon Potter (1880).

Large rimsherd with appliqued decoration. Thickness = 8.4 mm and diameter = 42 cm. Scale in centimeters.

Rimsherd of O'Byam Incised plate with a diameter of 62 cm. Scale in centimeters.

Half of a female effigy bottle. She kneels and her arms rest on her legs. Vessel wall thickness is 4.4 mm.

Head of a hooded water bottle with owl-like ears. Traces of black, red and white paint are visible on the sherd. Thickness = 7.4 mm and weight = 125.6 grams. The mouth of the bottle measures 37.9 mm wide and 33.6 mm. tall.

Pottery trowel with its handle broken off. Diameter = 97.5 mm, thickness = 15.3 mm and weight = 211.0 grams. The broken attachment for the trowel measures 37.3 mm in diameter.
Chapman, Carl H.
1980 Archaeology of Missouri, II. University of Missouri Press, Columbia.

O'Brien, Michael J.
1996 Paradigms of the Past: The story of Missouri Archaeology. University of Missouri Press, Columbia.

O'Brien, Michael J. and W. Raymond Wood
1998 The Prehistory of Missouri. University of Missouri Press, Columbia.

Potter, W. B.
1880 Archaeological remains in southeastern Missouri. in Contributions to the Archaeology of Missouri, by the Archaeological Section of the St. Louis Academy of Science Bates, Salem (Mass.)


Thanks to Karen O'Brien (Collections Manager, Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan) and John Speth (Curator, Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan) for permission to study artifacts from Missouri in the Museum of Anthropology at the University of Michigan. Many smiles to Ettus Hiatt for her help with text and content editing.

Webpage created 8 July 2009