Cooking pot in the Novgorod Archaeological Museum, Russia. Flat bottomed cooking vessels were commonly decorated with a few casually applied bands of incised lines. Archaeologists working at Novgorod and other Russian sites have worked out the suble evolution in the form of the rim and complexity of the incised decorations. This variety of cooking pot is fundamentally different from the round bottom, two handled cooking ware that is common at archaeological sites associated with the Roman/Byzantine cultural traditions. Slavic cuisine had less open fire cooking and more oven/baked cooking.

Cooking Pot -Russian, Кастрюли [Kastrolya]//// Belarusian, Рондаляў//// Bulgarian, готвене гърне//// Polish, garnek do gotowania//// Czech, hrnec//// Slovak, hrniec//// Serbian, лонца
Croatian, lonac za kuhanje//// Macedonian, Грне (gr-ney)

Cooking pot excavated in Russia.

Cooking pots illustrated by Sedov (1968).

Cooking pots illustrated by Sedov (1968).

Cooking pots illustrated by Sedov (1968).

Cooking pots illustrated by Dovzhenok (1966).

Cooking pot excavated in Poland.

Cooking pot excavated in Serbia (Ercegović-Pavlovic and Kostic 1988). .

Small cooking pot excavated in Serbia (Ercegović-Pavlovic and Kostic 1988).

Medieval cooking pot from Romania (Teodor 1988:Figure 5).

Medieval cooking pot from Romania (Teodor 1988:Figure 5).
Dovzhenok, Vasyl Iosypovych
1966 Drevnoruske misto Voïn. Naukova dumka, Kiev. [in Russian]

Ercegović-Pavlovic, Slavenka and Desanka Kostic
1988 Les monuments et les sites archéologiques dans la region de Leskovac. Beograd : Arheološki institu. [in Serbian with French summary]

Sedov, Valentin Vasil'evich
1982 Vostochnye slavi͡ane v VI-XIII vv. Moscow. [in Russian]

Teodor, D. G.
1984 Autohtoni şi migratori la est de. Carpaţi în secolele VI-X e.n. - Arheologia Moldovei 10:50-73.
Website constructed 19 November 2009
Revised 21 February 2010